Trojans welcome new political science club

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Trojans welcome new political science club

CCPC members at a Poor People's Campaign in Wichita. Co-founders Jack Murphy (middle right) and Ally Watson (center) organized the club's attendance to the rally.

CCPC members at a Poor People's Campaign in Wichita. Co-founders Jack Murphy (middle right) and Ally Watson (center) organized the club's attendance to the rally.

CCPC members at a Poor People's Campaign in Wichita. Co-founders Jack Murphy (middle right) and Ally Watson (center) organized the club's attendance to the rally.

CCPC members at a Poor People's Campaign in Wichita. Co-founders Jack Murphy (middle right) and Ally Watson (center) organized the club's attendance to the rally.

Jacob Gernon, Reporter

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This year, the halls of Troy are welcoming a new club, the Conflict, Compromise, and Political Culture club.

The Conflict, Compromise, and Political Culture club (CCPC) was started to give a platform for students to voice their political discussion, while at the same time developed argumentative skills.

The club’s three co-founders, Parker Jackson, Jack Murphy and Ally Watson say their personal interests and views spurred them on to start the club.

“We started this club because we wanted to have political discussion on topics we thought were important and we also wanted to develop argumentative and persuasive skills,” Jackson says.

“I really like political science and sharing political views and listening to other peoples’ political views. I think a lot of people are miseducated, especially our student body. I think our generation [needs to be] better educated politically,” co-founder Watson says.

The club’s meeting structure relies on group discussion during biweekly meetings, where students can debate and voice their views in an organized way. Various networks and connections are also an integral part of the club.

“We are very exited to reach out to many politicians, field experts, professors and attend many political diverse events,” co-founder Murphy says.

The club meets every other Thursday in room 207. The club is open to all.

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